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Save Water

Posted Date : 2/21/2018

I would like to mention the critical situation of water crisis through a news published in `” Dainik Bhaskar” Sunday 18th February 2018 edition. Humans need water for drinking, washing clothes and cooking their food. We need water also for agriculture and to maintain personal hygiene. Water is useful to keep our homes and surroundings clean. Many industrial processes too need water. Water is needed by all life forms. Animals also take a dip in the cool water of rivers in summers. All vegetation also survives because of water. All life forms and vegetation will die if there is no water. Water is a precious natural resource that should be used judiciously. Wastage of water must be avoided. We can save water by using the resource carefully. We must save water in whatever way we can. When we use water in our homes we must be careful; not to waste it. Drinking water must be stored in a clean and hygienic way. If water gets contaminated and is discarded due to improper storage it results in unnecessary wastage of water. Similarly, the water we use for our personal hygiene and for various domestic requirements must be in reasonable quantities. Using too much water for our shower or while brushing our teeth can be avoided. Taps must be closed when we are not using them. Likewise, if taps or water pipes are found to be leaking, we must repair them right away. We must also avoid using drinking water for watering plants. We also must wash our vehicles with limited water carried in buckets because running water through pipes waste unnecessary water. Maviya Rizwan Class- VIII Red Rose School Sindhi Colony Bhopal

 

Maviya Rizwan   (VIII)

Red Rose Berasia Road

   

School Life

Posted Date : 2/21/2018

School life: the best period of life. School makes a student to choose a way towards his success. It also helps in building ones character. Not only school provides education but also gives us a joyful experience and freedom of living. Every student should learn good things and utilize them to the fullest for the society. In school we learn discipline and punctuality which is the platform of a successful life. School is a place which inspires us to follow our dreams. My school is my second HOME. I am proud of being a part of it. Himansh Sharma Class VIII Red Rose School Sindhi Colony Bhopal

 

Himansh Sharma   (VIII)

Red Rose Berasia Road

   

Reserve Monitoring and an "Excessive Reserve Procedure"

Posted Date : 9/18/2015

The Need for New Policies Managing the world~s dollar dependency requires sanctioning excess reserve accumulation and decreasing the need for precautionary holdings of reserves. The goal must be to stabilize and then slowly reduce the amount of reserves relative to world GDP. Reserve Monitoring and an "Excessive Reserve Procedure" The International Monetary Fund (IMF) must be tasked to establish benchmarks foradequate reserve holdings—adequate being the level that reflects legitimate precautionary concern rather than an export subsidy. The definition of adequate reserve levels should account for country-specific factors such as openness to trade and capital flows, as well as the health of the banking sector and the quality of financial regulation: A country that is very open to foreign capital flows and has weak banks will legitimately want to hold more reserves than others. In light of the recent crisis, 30 percent of GDP would seem to constitute a realistic upper limit for most countries. If the IMF determines that a country has accumulated reserves in excess of its adequate level, it should discuss the issue with the government during its regular annual consultations. Policies to slow reserve accumulation should then be considered. To give this consultation teeth, there must be a credible threat of sanctions. The IMF should therefore have the right to initiate an excess reserve procedure against noncompliant countries

 

afsha ashfaq   (XII)

Red Rose Berasia Road

   

Internet of Things

Posted Date : 9/18/2015

Internet of Things From your refrigerator and home thermostat to your car or office whiteboard to your child’s textbook or doctor’s medical tablet, wireless technology is leaping beyond the phone to connect the world around us to the Internet. As wireless innovation continues, machine-to-machine (M2M) connectivity—the so-called “Internet of Things”— will further accelerate mobile opportunity and transform how people and our economy interact with the many tools of modern life. Through mobile connectivity, the Internet can make virtually anything more intelligent—holding great promise for our economy, our environment, our education and health care systems, our safety and our standard of living. Or The “Internet of Things” refers to the concept that the Internet is no longer just a global network for people to communicate with one another using computers, but it is also a platform for devices to communicate electronically with the world around them. The result is a world that is alive with information as data flows from one device to another and is shared and reused for a multitude of purposes. Harnessing the potential of all of this data for economic and social good will be one of the primary challenges and opportunities of the coming decades. A combination of technologies, including low-cost sensors, low-power processors, scalable cloud computing, and ubiquitous wireless connectivity, has enabled this revolution. Increasingly companies are using these technologies to embed intelligence and sensing capabilities in their products, thereby allowing everyday objects to sense, learn from, and interact with, their environment. Some of these devices engage in machine-to-machine communication. For example, sensors on the roadway electronically alert cars to potential hazards, and the smart grid sends dynamic electricity pricing data to home appliances in order to optimize power consumption. Other devices communicate information to their users, either directly through the product itself or indirectly through a web browser on a PC or mobile device. For example, decision support systems on farms may combine data on soil conditions from environmental sensors with historic and future pricing and weather data to produce recommendations to farmers on how to plant and fertilize particular plots of land. This transformation, while significant, will in many ways be inconspicuous to the average person because the changes to the physical environment will be invisible or subtle. A “smart” home or a “smart” bridge looks much the same as a “dumb” one—all of the intelligence is built into the infrastructure. Consumer products that have embedded intelligence (e.g., clothes dryers or thermostats) will not look significantly different from those in use today. Yet, despite outward appearances, the impact of the Internet of Things will be profound and will offer opportunities to address many of today’s major societal challenges. Its possibilities include new products and services that will help protect the environment, conserve energy, increase agricultural productivity, make transportation safer and faster, enhance public safety, and lead to better and more affordable health care. In addition, some products will simply assist busy consumers by providing timely information: thus, a smart refrigerator could remind its owner to buy milk when it is running low. Big changes are made up of little changes, and the Internet of Things could bring millions of incremental changes in the coming years. This report showcases the diversity of devices that make up the Internet of Things today, the potential application these devices may have for addressing different real-world problems, big and small, and the policy principles that will help government leaders maximize the benefits enabled by these new technologies. And for common people and even for girls and women’s these IOT devices and help lives improve and secure. Mobiles: Smartphone apps 1. Women~s Security 1) At first user have to save some details. These details include: Email address and password of the user, Email address and mobile number of the recipient and a Text Message. 2) Then initialize this app as a "widget" ,so that a finger touch is enough to alert your recipient 3) It will also record voice around surroundings for 45 seconds and then send these record and a text message to the recipient number. This message also includes the current position (latitude and longitude) of the victim. 2. Sentinel: Women~s Security This iOS app helps send an instant message to near and dear ones. The app is set to trigger different warning signals in case of different scenarios and can even send an alert if you move out of network zone. Alerts can be sent via email or via SMS. The app also comes with auto-off mode in case of low battery. 3 I AM SAFE I AM SAFE is a Google Play app that, similar to Sentinel, helps provide security to women. The app can send SMS to near and dear ones in case of difficulty. The app configures GPS and also sends location data along with the SMS. However, users can add just one emergency number to which the SMS will be sent. Social Networking FB, What’s app, viber, Hike are having instant messaging and calling services which can connect to multiple users even by previously creating family groups so while travelling you can sent bus, taxi no. and snapshots of travelers vehicles and time of departure etc to the belongings or family instantly, but never keep it public. E-Commerce : Flipkart, Snapdeal, Amazon, ebay etc. are day by day becoming bigger e-com giants but the financial security and investment priority of things depends on the consumer only, so use the most secure cash on delivery option only and never use debit or credit cards in online payment till you are totally safe to do so, as in this also (IOT) Mobile to site conversation involved which unveils your address, contacts, gender etc. to those sites of e-com which can also able to use or misuse it later on. Suggestions: 1. CCTV cams on streets: these help everyone to have evidence and fear among the criminals regarding the criminal activities to be done under surveillance. So if these are mounted in every public places it will make us secure 2. Active Helpline alerts like (CM Helpline): in the need of help the active help lines like 108 (Police, ambulance) services can be received within fue minutes. WHY WE NEED IOT? 1. It’s more than just connecting people. Mobile is about connecting everything. Experts predict over 50 billion connected devices by 2020. From connected medical tablets to the wired tools first responders rely on to keep our communities safe, the “Internet of Things” will greatly improve our lives and our economy. 2. Continued economic growth depends on a connected world. The proliferation of connected devices is projected to create $1.2 trillion in economic activity by 2020. This will create growth opportunities in diverse sectors throughout the U.S. economy as mobile connectivity is embedded into everyday things. 3. M2M growth means increased spectrum demand. M2M will be among the fastest drivers of mobile data growth, more than tablets or Smartphone’s. This fast-expanding array of connected devices will contribute to the capacity shortage we are facing with our nation’s airwaves. Given all the innovation that M2M connectivity will drive, it is imperative that our leaders act in a timely fashion to make more spectrum capacity available to continue expanding our wireless world.(simply means; Less spectrum lesser reactivity or response time leads to slower economical growth of any business or economy)

 

Aakash chouhan   (XII)

Red Rose Berasia Road

   

Connected Life

Posted Date : 9/18/2015

Connected Life This Internet of Things - a widely distributed, locally intelligent network of smart devices - will enable extensions and enhancements to fundamental services in education, health and other sectors, as well as providing a new ecosystem for application development. When objects can sense the environment and communicate, they become powerful tools for understanding complexity and responding to it effectively. Though such smart objects can interact with humans, they are likely to be interacting even more with each other automatically, without human intervention, updating themselves at their daily schedules. This evolution indeed makes a technological improvement in human livelihood which is also termed as Internet of things. In other words, The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the use of intelligently connected devices and systems to leverage data gathered by embedded sensors and actuators in machines and other physical objects. IoT is expected to spread rapidly over the coming years and this convergence will unleash a new dimension of services that improve the quality of life of consumers and productivity of enterprises, unlocking an opportunity that the GSMA refers to as the ‘Connected Life’. For consumers, the IoT has the potential to deliver solutions that dramatically improve energy efficiency, security, health, education and many other aspects of daily life. For enterprises, IoT can underpin solutions that improve decision-making and productivity in manufacturing, retail, agriculture and other sectors. Machine to Machine (M2M) solutions - a subset of the IoT – already use wireless networks to connect devices to each other and the Internet, with minimal direct human intervention, to deliver services that meet the needs of a wide range of industries. In 2013, M2M connections accounted for 2.8% of global mobile connections (195 million), indicating that the sector is still at a relatively early stage in its development. An evolution of M2M, the IoT represents the coordination of multiple vendors’ machines, devices and appliances connected to the Internet through multiple networks. (GSM/CDMA)Mobile Vision of connected Service. As the Connected Life evolves, the number of mobile connections worldwide is set to rise dramatically to reach 10.5 billion by 2020, while the total number of connected devices across all access technologies could reach 25.6 billion1. These devices will bridge the physical and digital worlds, enabling a new category of services that improve the quality of life and productivity of individuals, society and enterprises. “Eg: E-com, Women and child help-lines, Health and fitness apps and Bands, electricity & DTH billing services etc. became a basic need these days via cellular services. Financial Growth: Supported by cross-industry collaboration, the Connected Life will have a positive impact on many sectors of the economy, such as automotive, shipping and logistics, healthcare and utilities, potentially benefitting billions of people globally. As the Connected Life will have a fundamental impact on the way we live and work, there will also be major social and environmental benefits, such as improved healthcare, safer and more efficient transportation and logistics, better education and more efficient use of energy. With the ability to capture real-time usage information and provide remote control, embedded mobile connectivity can make a wide range of devices, machines and vehicles more efficient and effective, dramatically reducing waste and improving time productivity. The Internet of Things can enable the next wave of life-enhancing services across several fundamental sectors of the economy. In cities, the development of smart grids, data analytics and autonomous vehicles will provide an intelligent platform to deliver innovations in energy management, traffic management and security, sharing the benefits of this technology throughout society.

 

Aakash   (XII)

Red Rose Berasia Road

   

Navaratri Nine Avatars – 9 Forms of Maa Durga

Posted Date : 4/13/2013

During the festival of Navratri, Goddess Durga Devi is worshiped in nine avatars. During these nine holy days, each day of goddess Durga Mata is worshiped in different avatara. First day of Navratri – Kalasha Sthapana (Kalasha Pooja) or Ghata Sthapana – Shailaputri Puja Second day of Navratri – Preeti Dwitiya – Brahmacharini Puja Third day of Navaratri – Chandrakanta pooja or Chandraghanta puja Fourth day of Navaratri – Kushmanda pooja Fifth day of Navratri – Skandamata Puja – Lalitha Panchami Sixth day of Navratri – Katyayani Puja – Maha Shashti or Durga Shashti Seventh day of Navratri – Kaalratri Pooja – Durga Saptami or Maha Sapthami Eighth day of Navaratri – Maha Gauri Pooja – (Durgashtami Puja/Maha Ashtami/Veerashtami) Ninth day of Navaratri – Siddhidatri Puja – (Mahanavami/Maharnavami or Durga Navami) Tenth day of Navratri – Aparajitha Puja or Shami Pooja – Vijaya Dashami or Dasara

 

govind maheshwari   (X)

Red Rose Trilanga

   

Tradition of Holi

Posted Date : 4/6/2013

The colourful festival of Holi is celebrated by different names in this vast and culturally diverse country. The traditions followed for the festival varies a little and at times a lot as one moves from one state to other studying the various facets of the festival and getting behind the various colours of it. Nowhere it is celebrated with so much charm and enthusiasm as in Mathura, Vrindavan, Barsana and Nandgaon - the places associated with the birth and childhood of Lord Krishna. At Barsana Holi assumes the name of Lathmaar Holi. Here, women of Barsana give a tough time to men of Nandgaon as they come to play Holi with them. Women drag the unlucky captives, beat them, dress them in a female attire - yet all is in the spirit of Holi. Women of Haryana, specifically the bhabhis too get an upper hand on the day as they get a social sanction to beat their devars and take a sweet revenge for all the mischiefs they have played on them. This revengeful tradition is called the Dulandi Holi. The most enjoyable tradition of Holi, of course, apart from the play of colours is the tradition of breaking the pot. It is celebrated with much fan fair in the states of Maharashtra and Gujarat. Here a pot of buttermilk is hung high on the streets. Men form a huge human pyramid and one on the top breaks the pot with his head. All this while women keep singing Holi folk songs and throwing buckets and buckets of water. The tradition has its roots in the mischievous nature of Lord Krishna who was so fond of butter milk that he used to steal it from every accessible house in the village. To hide the butter from young Krishna, womenfolk used to hang it high. All in vain! Holi is celebrated in the most dignified manner in the state of Bengal. At Vishwa Bharti University, founded by Rabindranath Tagore founded the tradition of celebrating Holi as ~Basant Utsav~ or ~Spring Festival~. Students decorate the campus with intricate rangolis and carry out prabhat pheris in the morning. Clad in a traditional attire young boys and girls sing songs composed by Gurudev and present an enchanting view to the onlookers who gather in large number here. In other parts of Bengal, Holi is celebrated as Dol Yatra where the idols of Radha and Krishna are placed on a decorated palanquin and taken out in a procession. For Sikhs, Holi calls for the display of their physical strength and military prowess as they gather at Anandpur Sahib a day after Holi to celebrate Hola Mohalla. The tradition was started by the tenth and last guru of Sikh religion, Guru Gobind Singh ji and is being religiously carried forward. In the north east, Manipuris celebrate the festival in a colourful manner for six continuous days. Here, the centuries old Yaosang Festival of Manipur amalgated with Holi with the introduction of Vaishnavism in the eighteenth century. The highlight of the festival here is a special Manipuri dance, called ~Thabal Chongba~. Well, there are many-many more ways in which Holi is celebrated. Different states, different cities and different villages have come out with their unique and innovative styles of playing Holi. It may not be possible to describe all of them at one place. What is noteworthy though is the fact that the spirit of Holi remains the same throughout. It is the festival which generates the spirit of brotherhood and bring people close - and this is what matters most than anything else. What enhances the spirit of Holi though is the tradition of consuming the intoxicating bhang. It is generally consumed with thandai or as pakoras. People go high on it and enjoy the festival to the hilt. Other Holi delicacies include gujiya, mathri, malpua, puranpoli, dahi badas, etc. After a frenzied play of colours people love to gorge them up.

 

afzal khan   (X)

Red Rose Berasia Road

   

History of Holi

Posted Date : 4/6/2013

History of Holi Holi is an ancient festival of India and was originally known as ~Holika~. The festivals finds a detailed description in early religious works such as Jaimini~s Purvamimamsa-Sutras and Kathaka-Grhya-Sutras. Historians also believe that Holi was celebrated by all Aryans but more so in the Eastern part of India. It is said that Holi existed several centuries before Christ. However, the meaning of the festival is believed to have changed over the years. Earlier it was a special rite performed by married women for the happiness and well-being of their families and the full moon (Raka) was worshiped. Calculating the Day of Holi There are two ways of reckoning a lunar month- ~purnimanta~ and ~amanta~. In the former, the first day starts after the full moon; and in the latter, after the new moon. Though the amanta reckoning is more common now, the purnimanta was very much in vogue in the earlier days. According to this purnimanta reckoning, Phalguna purnima was the last day of the year and the new year heralding the Vasanta-ritu (with spring starting from next day). Thus the full moon festival of Holika gradually became a festival of merrymaking, announcing the commencement of the spring season. This perhaps explains the other names of this festival - Vasanta-Mahotsava and Kama-Mahotsava. Reference in Ancient Texts and Inscriptions Besides having a detailed description in the Vedas and Puranas such as Narad Purana and Bhavishya Purana, the festival of Holi finds a mention in Jaimini Mimansa. A stone incription belonging to 300 BC found at Ramgarh in the province of Vindhya has mention of Holikotsav on it. King Harsha, too has mentioned about holikotsav in his work Ratnavali that was written during the 7th century. The famous Muslim tourist - Ulbaruni too has mentioned about holikotsav in his historical memories. Other Muslim writers of that period have mentioned, that holikotsav were not only celebrated by the Hindus but also by the Muslims. Reference in Ancient Paintings and Murals The festival of Holi also finds a reference in the sculptures on walls of old temples. A 16th century panel sculpted in a temple at Hampi, capital of Vijayanagar, shows a joyous scene of Holi. The painting depicts a Prince and his Princess standing amidst maids waiting with syringes or pichkaris to drench the Royal couple in coloured water. A 16th century Ahmednagar painting is on the theme of Vasanta Ragini - spring song or music. It shows a royal couple sitting on a grand swing, while maidens are playing music and spraying colors with pichkaris. There are a lot of other paintings and murals in the temples of medieval India which provide a pictoral description of Holi. For instance, a Mewar painting (circa 1755) shows the Maharana with his courtiers. While the ruler is bestowing gifts on some people, a merry dance is on, and in the center is a tank filled with colored water. Also, a Bundi miniature shows a king seated on a tusker and from a balcony above some damsels are showering gulal (colored powders) on him. Legends and Mythology In some parts of India, specially in Bengal and Orissa, Holi Purnima is also celebrated as the birthday of Shri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu (A.D. 1486-1533). However, the literal meaning of the word ~Holi~ is ~burning~. There are various legends to explain the meaning of this word, most prominent of all is the legend associated with demon king Hiranyakashyap. Hiranyakashyap wanted everybody in his kingdom to worship only him but to his great disappointment, his son, Prahlad became an ardent devotee of Lord Naarayana. Hiaranyakashyap commanded his sister, Holika to enter a blazing fire with Prahlad in her lap. Holika had a boon whereby she could enter fire without any damage on herself. However, she was not aware that the boon worked only when she enters the fire alone. As a result she paid a price for her sinister desires, while Prahlad was saved by the grace of the god for his extreme devotion. The festival, therefore, celebrates the victory of good over evil and also the triumph of devotion. Legend of Lord Krishna is also associated with play with colors as the Lord started the tradition of play with colours by applying colour on his beloved Radha and other gopis. Gradually, the play gained popularity with the people and became a tradition. There are also a few other legends associated with the festival - like the legend of Shiva and Kaamadeva and those of Ogress Dhundhi and Pootana. All depict triumph of good over evil - lending a philosophy to the festival.

 

Abhishek kumar   (IX)

Red Rose Lambakheda

   

Ganesha Chaturthi

Posted Date : 9/13/2012

Ganesha Chaturthi, the great Ganesha festival, also known as ~Vinayak Chaturthi~ or ~Vinayaka Chavithi~ is celebrated by Hindus around the world as the birthday of Lord Ganesha. It is observed during the Hindu month of Bhadra (mid-August to mid-September) and the grandest and most elaborate of them, especially in the western India state of Maharashtra, lasts for 10 days, ending on the day of ~Ananta Chaturdashi~.

 

gunjan   (XII)

Red Rose Berasia Road

   

Supercomputer

Posted Date : 9/13/2012

The fastest type of computer. Supercomputers are very expensive and are employed for specialized applications that require immense amounts of mathematical calculations. For example, weather forecasting requires a supercomputer. Other uses of supercomputers include animated graphics, fluid dynamic calculations, nuclear energy research, and petroleum exploration. The chief difference between a supercomputer and a mainframe is that a supercomputer channels all its power into executing a few programs as fast as possible, whereas a mainframe uses its power to execute many programs concurrently.

 

dhruvtiwari   (IX)

Red Rose Trilanga

   

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